History

Dantec Dynamics as we know it today has its roots in the “Electronics department” established by Dansk Industri Syndikat (DISA) in 1947. DISA became interested in electronics – a completely new field in those days – as far back as the 1930s.

A few years later, in 1943, an engineer called Binzer and three Danmarks Radio employees set up a laboratory to undertake development projects in the field of low-current electronics.

Image of history
The first DISA anemometer – 55A01 – was launched in 1958. It was DISA’s first instrument for flow measurements

DISA became interested in the laboratory’s activities, which complemented the work that it was itself involved in, as well as its future plans. So Binzer and his three colleagues moved their laboratory to DISA’s premises. As mentioned above, the company’s electronics activities were gathered together in the Electronics Department four years later, in 1947 – now celebrated as the year in which Dantec Dynamics was born.

The department very soon began to develop a wide range of high-quality products for use both in medicine and the measurement of pressure and rotation. One of these early products, DISATAC, which measures rotation in turbochargers, is still sold to the marine and offshore industries.

It was during the 1950s that the knowledge was developed on which the company based its expertise in flow measurement – know-how that provided the foundations for Dantec Dynamics’s current position as the world’s leading supplier of instrumentation for flow measurement and particle characterisation.

The company launched the worlds first commercial Constant Temperature Anemometer (CTA) in 1958. Researchers all over the world had begun to take an interest in constant temperature anemometry in the late 1940s, so Dantec Dynamics’s measurement equipment was welcomed with open arms. This was the first major step in the development of a range of innovative measurement systems in the fields of Laser Doppler Anemometry, Particle Dynamics Analysis and Particle Image Velocimetry.